What is Wind Therapy?

What is Wind Therapy?

Growing up we were told that riding motorcycles were dangerous, and although this is true, it has some real health benefits.  Some UCLA researchers and Harley Davidson teamed up to study these benefits.

Wind therapy is often used by Vets or people suffering from a trauma, a special kind of therapy that is achieved by riding motorcycle and the freedom that comes along with it. Wind therapy reduces stress, increases focus and a sense of awareness.

We all know that riding a motorcycle comes with a higher risk than driving a car, but to a select few of us, the rewards outweigh the risks.  The feeling of the wind on your face, the sun shining, an open road and the roar of an engine.  These kinds of days are what bikers live for, but even if the weather is bad, you can often find many of us riding anyways.

Is Riding for Everyone?

Riding is not for everyone, it takes focus, skill, and coordination.  There is a freedom while riding on a motorcycle that you cannot get from riding in a car; A sense of calm and peace that exists between you and your bike.  There is a healing power that come from riding a motorcycle.  Therefore, bikers have adopted the term Wind Therapy, a term they use to say they are going riding.  They are going to get Wind Therapy.

Riding a motorcycle also has the added benefit of a full body workout.  To balance on and maneuver the bike safely, you must use all your muscles.  There is a common misbelief that motorcycle riders are lazy.  This is untrue, as most bikes weigh upwards of 300 pounds. A bicycle on average weighs just 17 pounds.

How do candles and motorcycles come together?

So how do candles and motorcycles come together?  Easy.  Candles are also therapeutic.  Candles are calming and add a sense of warmness to a space.  So, it was easy to put two things I love together into one beautiful package.  The great outdoors is known for its healing.  Wind Therapy candles brings the scents of the outdoors to the indoors, creating a calming effect for those days you cannot be outside getting your Wind Therapy.

http://www.windtherapycandles.com

http://bikerdigital.com/new-study-proves-motorcycle-riding-increase-focus-relieve-stress/

https://roadtrippers.com/magazine/riding-motorcycle-good-for-your-health/

Memorial Candles and Scent

Memorial candles require a sympathetic heart and a sensitive touch.  I try to be empathetic with how that person viewed their loved one when I make a memorial candle.  A memorial candle that I am often asked to make is for a pet that has passed on.  When we had to put our own dog to sleep, it helped me to really understand how important the small details can be to the grieving person.

Experts say that scent is our strongest link to memory.  Scent can remind us of unpleasant things and it can also remind us of the best of things as well.  The emotional brain, or Olfactory, triggers things of significance to our memories.  It can often prompt powerful responses.

Our emotions are tied so strongly to scent that it can even affect our moods.  It’s one of the reasons I focus on bringing the scents of the outdoors to the indoors.  Nature is one of the best natural healers.  Food scents are also a very strong memory trigger.  The smell of fresh baked goods can bring a smile to anyone’s face.

A properly scented candle will give you or a friend a fond memory every time the candle it lit.  I can custom make labels in a variety of ways.  A picture and/or a quote give the memorial candle label a special touch.  Personalization is available with any scent available.

With memorial candles, my goal is to help you remember your loved one through your strongest memory; scent.

 

https://www.discovery.com/science/Why-Smells-Trigger-Such-Vivid-Memories

Fire Safety and Candles

Fire Safety and Candles:

According to the U.S. Consumer and Safety Commission, a study showed that approximately 85 percent of candles fires are avoidable.  For fire safety and candles, follow these three basic rules:

  1. Don’t leave a lit candle unattended
  • Try to avoid lighting candles early in the morning before having to leave and try to avoid lighting them at night when there is a possibility of falling asleep while it’s still burning.
  1. Don’t light a candle near anything else that is flammable
  • Curtains, paperwork and even kitchen cabinets are potentially things in your home that a candle flame that can catch on fire. Only a few seconds is needed before a fire can get out of control.
  1. Keep candles away from kids and pets
  • Small children can easy knock a candle over or burn themselves.  Your pets fur could catch on fire, or they could also knock over the candles.

Other Candle Safety Tips:

  1. Trim wicks before every use
  • Trim the wick down to 1/4″.  Don’t leave the wick trimming in the candle.
  1. Avoid drafts and heating/air vents
  • Drafts can cause an uneven burning of the candle as well as dancing flames.
  1. Light on a flat surface
  • A flat tabletop or countertop are the recommended surfaces for enjoying your candles. Avoid lighting candles on windowsills and fireplace hearths.
  1. Never touch a lit candle
  • Candle vessels can get very hot the further down the candle burns.  As a result more heat is kept inside the vessel and attempting to move the candle can result in serious burns.  Dropping a hot can vessel can cause it to break or explode.
  1. Don’t move a lit candle
  • The vessels can get very hot and lifting a hot vessel can cause you to drop it, causing damage to the vessel and could possibly cause a fire or for you to burn yourself
  1. Don’t light a candle that has obvious oil seepage
  • If a candle has liquid looking beads, do not light it. Those “sweating” candles usually have an unequal of wax to fragrance oil ratio and are a huge fore hazard
  1. Use a candle coaster
  • A glass or resin coaster can protect your flat surface from potential heat damage from the candle vessel. The candle lid will work well as a buffer between your candle and table or counter top as well.

 

https://www.cpsc.gov/Regulations-Laws–Standards/Voluntary-Standards/Topics/Candles#:~:text=The%20U.S.%20Consumer%20Product%20Safety,to%20candles%20and%20candle%20accessories.&text=45%20for%20Candles%20and%20Candle,address%20fires%20associated%20with%20candles.

A Brief History Of Candles

Candles are like food; they are appropriate for every occasion.  Scented candles are a way to bring the outdoors indoors.  Candles have also been the go-to for a source of light for thousands of years.  Ceremonies and celebrations have featured candles throughout history.  And as a result of artistic creativity candles have had the most growth over the last 140 years.

Nobody knows exactly when candles were invented, but the earliest candles were made using animal fat, which gave off a foul and rancid odor.  The Romans are responsible for the invention and use of beeswax candles and modern wicks.  Unlike tallow, beeswax was very expensive, and therefore very few could afford this type of clean burning candle.

Colonial women in America discovered the use of bayberry wax.  Bayberry wax was clean burning and sweet smelling, but it was very time consuming and difficult to make.  Sperm whale oil wax became the preferred choice for candle making in the 18th century.

Wax candles as we know them today almost disappeared with the invention of electricity.  Light bulbs caused candles to became purely a decorative item.  In the 1980’s scented candles and colored candles became increasingly popular.  Because of their popularity and, sometimes necessity, an estimated 3.4 billion dollars a year are spent on the candle industry.

Home décor wouldn’t be complete without a beautiful and great smelling candle.  Large, medium and small companies make and sell candles all over the world.  Home makers are becoming a growing part of the market in the candle world.  Wax and fragrance mixing is a true scientific art.  As a chandler, I am in awe of the centuries of progress it took to get candles to where they are today.